Adult Classes

2019

Fall Catalogue

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The Importance of Emotions
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The Story Beneath the Story

October 8th :: 6 -8pm

 

While plot is fun, and style is sexy, the reader's experience is everything if you want to connect with your audience. If you want to write strong, compelling, page-turning, tell-everyone fiction, then you must make your readers feel. This class will teach you to how go deep into your characters, how to make them real, and most importantly, how to make the reader care about them. Click here for more information

Climate Change 101 for Writers - What is happening and what can we do about it? This is a discussion group for support and collaboration, with optional writing projects.

 

This group will meet on the first Thursday of every month in perpetuity. 7-8:30pm. 

 

Click here for more information. 

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Sunday, October 13th :: 10 - 12pm

 

This one-day course provides a range of strategies and lessons on how to write a query letter that catches an agent or publisher's attention and to make it pop out of the slush pile. Click here for more information. 

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This group is for serious writers who are prepared to make a commitment and go deeper into their writing practice through ongoing peer review and discussion.

 

Our first workshop is wait-listed

So we opened a second one on Saturday mornings.

 

Click here for more information. 

This quarterly course is an homage to our literary foremothers and, as Kate Zambreno puts it, the “genealogy of erased women.” Consider this a supplement to a lack in the accepted literary canon. A deep dive into one text at a time. Insights will be both academic and emotional. In other words, an intensive book club. Click here for more information

This season, we'll be discussing Orlando by Virginia Woolf.

 

Film screening :: Tba.

Book discussion :: Tuesday, October 22nd.

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September 18th - October 30th :: 7pm

 

A course for writers who like to explore the truths of life through story. 

 

Delve into the questions of the human experience in your writing by learning from the greatest authors of all time: Tolkien, Melville, Austen, Dostoyevsky, Asimov, Bradbury, Orwell, George Eliot, and others.

 

Click here for more information

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October 18th :: 7-9pm.

 

Vladimir Nabokov’s controversial story of a man’s infatuation with a twelve year old girl is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of the English language, but in our current climate, would a draft even make it across an editor’s desk? Click here for more information. 

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First Film :: Breakfast at Tiffany's

October 4th :: Film Screening at 6pm.

 

Join us for a series of screenings and discussions about famous books and their cinematic counterparts: how stories and themes change for better or worse when transitioned from words to visuals, how different is too different, and more. Click here for more information

Venus_de_Milo_with_Drawers._Salvador_Dal

October 17th :: 6-8pm

 

What is experimental writing? 

Experimental Writing refuses to stay inside the borders drawn by traditional, realistic fiction. In this course we're going to talk about the playfulness of experimentation, and the importance of artistic exploration. We'll walk through some of the most famous experimental texts and play with some writing exercises to expand any palette. Click here for more information. 

* All images are courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Top image ::

 

Shaffron

Italian, Milan. 1575.

From the Art Institute's webpage:

"Chivalry—with its connotation of the knightly ideal—was intimately connected with the horse (cheval in French). A knight took care to protect his mount, on which he was dependent for the mobility and speed required in both attack and retreat. In Roman times, some heavy cavalry used armor made of iron or bronze scales to protect their horses. From the twelth century on, knights covered their steeds in bands of iron mail (a network of interlocking rings). By the fifteenth century, full-plate armors were not uncommon. This shaffron, or headpiece, is etched in gilt bands with decoration on a finely dotted ground. Riveted between the eyes is an elongated conical spike, perhaps inspired by the horn of the mythical unicorn. A manifestation of great power and wealth, the shaffron has been valued for centuries as an object of beauty, not just as a tool of warfare and sport."

The Republic of Letters NFP

RoL is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization

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1 West State Street, Suite 103. Geneva, Illinois 60134

630-360-1902